Lysias, Speeches (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose; rhetoric] [word count] [lemma count] [Lys.].
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For Callias

5.1If Callias had anything else than his life at stake in this trial, gentlemen of the jury, I should be content with what you have heard from the other speakers; but, as it is, and when he urges and requests me, and he is not only a friend of mine but was one of my father's so long as he lived, and we have had many arrangements between us, I feel it would be disgraceful not to support Callias so far as justice requires and my ability permits. 5.2I did expect, indeed, that the character that he showed as an alien residing in this city would far more readily gain for him some benefit at your hands than allow him to face so grave a danger because of such accusations as you have heard. But I find that these designing persons make life no less dangerous for those who have done no wrong than for those who are guilty of many misdeeds. 5.3You, however, ought not to credit the statements of mere servants and discredit those of the accused; for you should reflect that no one, either private citizen or magistrate, has ever indicted Callias before, and that while dwelling in this city he has bestowed many benefits upon you, and has arrived at his time of life with a blameless reputation; whereas these men, having spent their lives in committing serious offences and incurring a variety of troubles, make their speeches to-day with an air of having performed a great service, merely in the hope of freedom. note And I am not surprised; 5.4for they know that, if they are convicted of lying, they will suffer nothing worse than their actual lot; while if they succeed in deceiving you they will be rid of their present troubles. Yet surely such men as these, whether accusers or witnesses, should win no credit, when they have a great profit to make for themselves by their statements concerning others; much rather should it be given to those who, to uphold the public weal, note involve themselves in danger. 5.5The trial, in my opinion, ought to be regarded, not as the personal affair of the accused, but as the common concern of everybody in the city; for these note are not the only people who own servants; they are owned by everyone else, and looking at the fate of the accused will no longer ask themselves by what great service to their masters they might gain their freedom, but by what lying information about them.



Lysias, Speeches (English) (XML Header) [genre: prose; rhetoric] [word count] [lemma count] [Lys.].
<<Lys. 4 Lys. 5 (Greek) >>Lys. 6

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